Mission

Over the past two decades in the U.S., suicide rates have risen by 33 percent. Sounds of Saving aims to fuel the hope needed to reverse that trend, ultimately improving mental health and reducing suicide rates.

We fuel hope both by celebrating the power of human connection to music, and by directing people towards the resources they need before it’s too late - because suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem.

Research shows that an overwhelming number of people who survive a suicide attempt are glad they lived, and do not die by another attempt. And over 90 percent of suicide victims have a diagnosable mental disorder. We believe that a connection to music, or to whatever treatment is best for a particular individual, can intervene and save lives.

Music is a powerful tool for strengthening mental health. It’s the universal human language of emotion, connecting us across genres and continents. And our personal stories about how music creates hope are especially powerful. Sounds of Saving works with musicians willing to share how music has helped them through difficult times, and who will use their platform to promote opening up and seeking help during mental health challenges. These relatable stories about overcoming hopelessness or distress, especially from those we admire, have been proven to decrease suicide attempts and can normalize conversations about mental health.

Mass media can save lives by presenting non-suicide alternatives to crises. This phenomenon is known as the Papageno Effect, named after a lovelorn character from the opera The Magic Flute who contemplates suicide until others offer him hope. For instance after Logic’s 2017 VMA performance of his song “1-800-273-8255,” titled after the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, the Lifeline recieved the second-highest call volume in its history. Music, which resonates with everyone in individual ways, is a powerful tool for the Papageno Effect - and one that can use contagious hope to improve the lives of at-risk people and populations.

Sounds of Saving believes that authentic human connection lies at the core of confronting mental illness. While social media can be a valuable tool for connection and we use it to share our content, we also recognize that it can have harmful effects on mental health in a variety of ways. We ask you to check in with yourself while you’re scrolling, and take a break if it doesn’t feel right.

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History

In late 2016, I attended an event for a suicide-focused nonprofit that a friend of a friend has founded after losing his brother. I didn't expect to be majorly affected. But after recalling my Uncle Mike taking his own life, and the numerous friends that I lost to drug overdoses over the years, I knew I had to do something.  

For me, music had always been the thing. The thing that picked me up when I was low. The thing that made me feel less alone. THE THING. But how could I use music to raise awareness and prevent suicides? 

It immediately hit me that everyone I know who loves or plays music says the same thing: “Without music, I don’t know where I would be”. And on the spot, Sounds of Saving was created.

— Nick Greto, Founder

Team

Nick Greto

Founder

nick@soundsofsaving.com

‍Nick created Sounds of Saving in 2017 as a response to losing his uncle to suicide. He has always found solace in music. Nick grew up in a family of musicians, creates music himself, has written for music publications, and even helped found a small Brooklyn record label.

A graduate of Widener University with a degree in psychology, he has been involved in technology and music in NYC since 2007. Nick currently resides in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn with his wife, Dana, and two daughters.

Charlie Gross

Co-Founder

charlie@soundsofsaving.com

Charlie Gross is a psychotherapist and photographer based in Brooklyn. His photography work explores the overlap between creativity and mental health. In the ‘90s, Charlie was a personal photographer for Beck and based his work largely in the music world. His current work includes a long-term artist residency at Kings County Hospital in which he uses collaborative photography with young adult patients to tell their stories.

Charlie treats young adult patients with substance use and psychiatric disorders at the Weill Cornell Medical Center and in private practice. He holds a BA in Comparative Literature from Columbia University and an MA in Clinical Psychology from the City University of New York.

Board of Advisors

Adrienne C. Moore

actor, Orange is the New Black

Alec Bemis

founder Brassland Records

Bradley Tusk

venture capitalist and philanthropist

Dana Wachs

live sound engineer for Cat Power, Deerhunter, St. Vincent and others, musical director for Rachel Comey & singer songwriter for Vorhees

Joanna P. Elliot

nonprofit management consultant including for Jennifer Lopez’s "Lopez Family Foundation" & Linkin Park’s "Music For Relief"

Julia Cumming

singer/songwriter Sunflower Bean & activist

Ken Weinstein

Cofounder and co-president of Big Hassle Media

Meshell Ndegeocello

musician

Owen Grover

Pocketcast CEO

Peter Shapiro

promoter/owner of Brooklyn Bowl & Capitol Theatre